Working Together ~ Achieving Success

The Laurens-Marathon School District has always been proud of “Working Together to Achieve Success” and Friday’s first elementary MakerDay was a wonderful example of their building motto.  After months of planning, preparing, compiling community donations of supplies and organizing helpers & volunteers, the day went off fabulously. I can’t say that there weren’t hiccups but as a whole, the day was very positive. Student engagement was near 100% and learning was at a high.

What would one see if they walked the halls that day?

  • Students jabbering – lots of it. (“Did you see what happened when I did this?! Where do you think the marble will go if I do this?”)
  • Students are NOT sitting in desks in rows. They might be sprawled on the floor, in groups, running to keep up with their Sphero or jumping up and down in celebration (“My tower didn’t topple! My engineered car worked! Woo-hoo, my chariot can carry my Lego-guy!”).
  • Creating, lots and lots of creating (cutting, pasting, attaching, coloring, drawing, coding, the list goes on…)
  • The teacher is NOT at the front of the room lecturing. Instead he/she is off to the side, providing support and asking the important questions.
  • Students are asking questions AND teachers are asking questions.
  • Students were in groups, collaborating, Working Together.
  • Smiles – happy students and happy teachers.

It was a beautiful thing.  Success?  I think so.

Not on Twitter but want to see images and videos of the day? Click here for our Storify!

 

 

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The Art of APEX

Earlier this week I had an opportunity to visit an extremely forward thinking school in the Des Moines area, Waukee APEX (Aspiring Professional Experience). After circling the downtown block with the correct address several times, I finally committed to parking… “Really? This is the school?” There was no school signage, business people were going in and out, and there wasn’t a student in sight (at least, upon first assumption). My world was about to be rocked. Inside was, indeed, a business. Most of the people I saw were employees but mixed in were junior and senior students from the Waukee school district, dressed and definitely acting the part of an employee.  Their “classroom” is housed the business space of DLR Group and without prior knowledge, one would think of these young individuals as paid employees doing regular work.  They was 17 students, an instructor and a buzz of activity. This particular course was Designing Communication Solutions which is within the APEX Business, Technology & Communications Strand (other strands can be found here). Throughout the semester, these students are paired with businesses to complete requested projects and work for a few hours every afternoon instead of attending conventional, bell-to-bell classes.  I would normally put air quotes around work but I can’t, they are doing real, actual work for real, actual businesses.  They have clients to consult and deadlines to meet. Sounds familiar – like my job – but they are high school students. LOVE!

Through inquiry-based learning and authentic experiences, students build skills in key areas: productivity/accountability, complex communication, critical thinking, creativity, collaboration and flexibility/adaptability. They are featured below (graphic art/design credit: Brandon Vacco, APEX Student).Screen Shot 2015-12-09 at 12.33.09 PM

As a mother, educator, community member and regular ‘ol human being – I want this opportunity for ALL kids. Rural or urban. Small or large district. Financially stable or financially struggling. How do we make this happen? If you are a parent, ask your child’s teacher what real-world applications are happening in your their classroom. Volunteer your business or expertise if you see a fit.  If you are an educator, keep doing awesome things but #makeitbetter – there is always room for improvement. If you see an opportunity to work outside the 4 walls of your classroom, take it! Only good can come from students seeing the relevance and real-world application of the work they are doing in their classroom. And if you are removed from the local educational institution for whatever reason (kids have graduated, etc.) – get back in there, attend a school board meeting, ask questions, offer your services, listen, volunteer, be active! It takes a village.

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